UCWW #21: Shop Safety – A Near Miss on the Tablesaw

Well, that was stupid.

I was working on my series on mitered splines. A tour of the jig and even a boring math lesson. I was ready to show the Eagle America Spine Jig Pro in action.

And I had a great idea, I thought. Tape the Allen key that is used to adjust the miter bar tightness right to the jib itself, so it won’t get lost. Except I taped it in the path of the blade.

Here’s what happened when I made the initial cut through the jib on the tablesaw.

I’m pretty lucky the Allen key didn’t shoot across the shop. I didn’t even notice the sparks at the time. Luckily nothing was damaged and I wasn’t hurt.

Be safe in the shop.

UCWW #19 Tool Tour Eagle America Spline Jig Pro

I’ve built spline jigs before. Quick and dirty ones. It was time for me to get a more permanent, better built spline jig. Eagle America came out with the Spline Jig Pro a while back, and when it went on sale, I bought it.

Assembly took about 30 minutes, that included futzing with the camera and fitting the miter bar to my miter slot. The parts are well machined for the most part, with any problems being cosmetic and not impacting the accuracy of the jig.

Eagle America has assembly and usage videos on their site.

Assembly Tips

  1. Read all the instructions before starting assembly
  2. Don’t fully tighten screws until you’re done with a sub-assembly
  3. Be careful using a screw gun, you’re tightening screws into an insert in MDF
  4. Be careful adjusting the bar to your miter slot – it’s hard to adjust the bar after it’s been installed on the jig
  5. The short screws (there are only two) are used to attach the miter bar to the sled
  6. Well placed holes through the cradle and sled would make miter bar adjustability easier

Usage Tips

  1. Make sure your miter slot is parallel to your blade
  2. Carefully set the angle and height of the blade before making your first cut
  3. The stop push the stop blocks into the base of the cradle to square them up when adjusting

UCWW #18 Tool Tour Grizzly H192 Sander

For Christmas Wifey got me a Grizzly H8192 8″ Disc/1″ Belt Combination Sander. I finally assembled it and gave it a run through.

It’s very similar to the Rikon 50-142, so much so that the Grizzly is an exact ripoff, or they are built in the same factory and painted different colors (except for some handles – check the video).

Overall impressions

  1. There were some areas on the adjustable tables that weren’t machined at all and had to be filed.
  2. The screws that hold the shroud for the disc don’t seem to be the right size, I used my own.
  3. The machine is heavy enough that it does not skid around.
  4. The included abrasive disc was flaking, I’ll use it up and then replace it with my Klingspor Discs.
  5. I’m not sure how the dust collection will work, I don’t think it will work with the belt at all.

Future plans are to build a sanding center with my Ridgid Combo Sander and this on top, with storage underneath for handheld sanders, sandpaper, Tadpoles, and sanding blocks.